Super Bowl LIV Ad Recap

Super Bowl LIV Ad Recap

1920 1281 Hunt Adkins

Which ads were Chiefs (great), 49ers (Good) and Browns (bad)?

 

Listen to Patrick Hunt discuss this and more with WCCO.

Patrick Hunt, President/CEO of Hunt Adkins, joined WCCO Radio’s Adam Carter to recap Super Bowl LIV’s ads, as well as tease the potential demand for a [Grateful] Dead-focused podcast.

Listen in or read the transcript below.

 

Transcript [Reading time: 9 min 41 sec]

Adam Carter:
I’m very happy to announce that Patrick Hunt is here. Now we’re going to before we get to the advertising talk, we’re going to announce that we’re going to start a podcast devoted to The Dead.

Patrick Hunt:
We’re going to convert some people. Right.

Adam Carter: How are you, sir?

Patrick Hunt:
I’m doing good.

Adam Carter:
Looking good as always.

Patrick Hunt:
Well, thank you. As do you. It seems nicer in here doesn’t?

Adam Carter:
When Chad’s not here?

Patrick Hunt:
Is that it, you think?

Adam Carter:
It is. I think it is.

Patrick Hunt:
Okay. It’s just friendlier, kinder.

Adam Carter:
Patrick Hunt, CEO of Hunt Adkins, a local advertising agency in town here. Your overall impression of, I guess the ads, first of all,

Patrick Hunt:
I actually a little more positive than I anticipated. There was a lot of chatter early, online friends, et cetera, that it was a weak year. I know you weren’t particularly fond with the first quarter spots, I don’t think.

Adam Carter: Is that still what’s the most valuable, or is their most valuable?

Patrick Hunt:
That’s an interesting question. So there’s, it’s kind of an interesting story. So there used to be five major pods and then Fox reduced it to four, which actually increased their value because there are less pods, meaning there’s less, there’s more, there’s, it’s the same amount of spots. They’ve got more spots in each pod. But there’s an A spot in a pod and a Z. The A is a lead-in, and the Z is the one out. And, and there’s no like scientific methodology. Typically people want the A because it’s coming right out of the action. People are paying attention, particularly are in the game. And then the Z leads into action. But sometimes the Z leads into a station promo, for example. So you don’t really know, but there’s a kind of a quasi-science behind that as well. First quarter, third quarter, second, fourth, A, and Z.

Adam Carter:
And that’s reflected in what they charge for this?

Patrick Hunt:
It is reflected in what they charge or priorities. So you know, advertisers from last year get priority in the following year.

Adam Carter:
Now I’ve already said my favorite, humorous one was the Cheetos ad with the hammer and Cheetos Popcorn. You can’t touch this.

Patrick Hunt:
So you liked that better than Groundhog day?

Adam Carter:
I did. I guess. I think it’s because Groundhog today, I saw it in the morning, you know, and I liked the, I like the ones that surprise me where I have no idea that they’re coming.

Patrick Hunt:
You know, I get that there’s just more and more released cause they want to get their value. And I think people are so tuned in to see new spots, and when they see, when they’ve seen before it, it really is kind of a letdown, I think.

Adam Carter:
And we’re, so we’re going to rate these…

Patrick Hunt:
Yes, we are.

Adam Carter:
…as Good, Bad and Great.

Patrick Hunt:
Well, I think it should be Cleveland Browns, Bad. 49ers would be good because they almost won. And then Chiefs should be, almost great.

Adam Carter:
It’s a great rating system. So I give the Cheetos Popcorn, that’s a Kansas City Chiefs. Other ones? Who’s your Kansas City Chiefs of ads?

Patrick Hunt:
Well I think I’m for sure, Groundhog Day. I thought it was great. Uh, you know, perfectly acted as you would expect.

Adam Carter:
Oh, and especially with the, uh, the net Ned Ryerson character.

Patrick Hunt: Yeah, you know, here’s an interesting thing, and my chief strategist referred this to me. There’s a professor named David Beer. He’s a sociology professor at the University of York, and he came up with this term called “platform nostalgia.” And he says, because of social media, it uniquely ties the younger and older generations together because the younger generations can instantly get educated on what the reference is.

Adam Carter:
Right.

Patrick Hunt:
And so now something like MC Hammer, it could be, you know, an 18 year old and people our age that completely get the reference and the history. So there’s a few of those.

Adam Carter:
Yeah. The Snickers ad the, the hole in the earth.

Patrick Hunt:
The opposite of Coke. The cynical Coke. Yeah I thought that was great.

Adam Carter:
Great ad? So that’s a Kansas City Chiefs as what chief said, that was a Chiefs ad for me to. The Rocket Mortgage one. This is what Jason Mamoa taking his body off. Uh, what’d you give that one?

Patrick Hunt:
I had that as a Chiefs too. I did. Because it was kind of self-effacing on his reputation. I thought the CGI was fantastic. I thought it was just kind of funny and unexpected.

Adam Carter:
Yeah. That was another surprise when I knew he was going to be a, in the ad, but I didn’t think it was going to take that kind of turn. Yeah. I’ll give that one a Chiefs too. We gotta take a short break here for the impeachment update. Patrick Hunt is a CEO of Hunt Adkins, the advertising agency, going over the ads from last night. What a hit, what missed, and I want your input to six, five one nine eight, nine, nine two two six.

Patrick Hunt: Bob Weir thinks it’s the late Eighties, actually. Which I would kind of be right there around..

Adam Carter:
Brett Midland..

Patrick Hunt:
…even though Brett Midland wasn’t my favorite, to be honest. A little poppy for me. But, uh, I think he felt they were like in a really good place in terms of the ability to play well every night if you know what I’m saying?

Adam Carter:
Oh yeah, exactly, they said it revitalized the band in the late eighties.

Patrick Hunt:
And I’m really liking Dead and Company to be honest.

Adam Carter:
Yeah. I got to check them out. I mean, John Mayer, a dude can shred on a guitar.

Patrick Hunt:
I watched Nugs TV the other night. As a matter of fact, they said 2019 shows on.

Adam Carter:
Oh, very good. I’ll have to sign up for that. Okay. How about, uh, let’s see, how about some Browns? Who are the Cleveland Browns of the ads last night?

Patrick Hunt:
Well, I had, let’s see here. The Tom Brady Hulu spot. I had the 2016 and 2017 Browns, so they want a 1- and everything. I just thought it was, you know. You can kind of give them kudos, but they suck everybody in with a tweet the other day, and then it was kind of like, “Oh, you did that so you can kind of a bad spot.” It talks about nothing other than coming back.

Adam Carter:
Kind of a letdown?

Patrick Hunt:
Yeah, I thought it was a big let town. And you know, I didn’t realize it was Tide. I guess I was taken like everybody else, but I’m not sure that’s what you want to do.

Adam Carter:
Yeah I’ll give that one a 49er. Cause I liked the tease and I thought, you know, you can’t go wrong with Tom Brady. By the way too. I can; I will still say that Tom Brady better looking than Jimmy Garappolo. It was proven in that spot that dude I mean, I’ve some, I’m secure in my sexuality, but Tom Brady, Holy moly. And I mean, the guy, he looks like he’s younger every year.

Patrick Hunt:
How do you know it’s not CGI?

Adam Carter:
That’s a good point. I mean, if they can take the muscles off Jason Momoa, they can make Tom Brady look better. Okay. Other, uh, Cleveland Brown spots.

Patrick Hunt: Winona and Winona, I thought, was…

Adam Carter:
Really???

Patrick Hunt:
Well, I mean, did you, did you rate higher?

Adam Carter: I’ve seen higher. I, I, I give that one a 49ers just because maybe it’s, I’m influenced because I’ve, I saw, I was on the website, their website that they created for the city of Winona. I mean, it’s great for the city of Winona but then all the longer videos that they had with her. I mean, they owe royalties to the Cohen brothers cause it was like a scene out of Fargo.

Patrick Hunt:
Yeah. Which is funny cause I read a review today saying, you know, thankfully they didn’t go for the flat accent. I’m like they went for the flat accent.

Adam Carter:
I was gonna say, yeah, okay. Yeah, yeah.

Patrick Hunt: You know, actually I went to that website too and I, I used to, or I still feel that Winona is a very beautiful town, but I don’t think that photography did it much justice that way. Cause this is all winter cold gray days. You could tell the fly in, and whatever the day was because she was available, that’s when they shot. So it was, it was a kind of dark and dreary in my opinion.

Adam Carter:
But any other Browns stand out for you? Maybe one that we can go with?

Patrick Hunt:
The Paint It Black, I think. I get, you know, I guess I give Pepsi credit for being disciplined with big stars and celebrities for years and years. It goes way, way back, you know, back to Michael Jackson. And it’s always big production numbers and big stars, but there’s never really not a there, there. And I think showing a Coke can and then turning a black with a song is probably about as lazy as you can get in terms of strategy.

Adam Carter:
Too obvious? We talked a little before you got in here, we were talking about the Google ad, the heartstrings. I mean, I’ll give that a Kansas City Chiefs.

Patrick Hunt: For sure. You know, I sat there and watched it and you know, maybe I’m overthinking this. I think from a media play, I think it would have been a better Oscar’s launch. You know, we’re all here having a party and watching the Super Bowl, and then you get hit with this. Is it Alzheimer’s? Is it just, you know? It was incredibly powerful. It stuck out. It was really the only true, memorable, serious spot, which is all good. But I guess it’s up for debate on that placement.

Adam Carter:
The Smarht Pahk, the Boston accent, the product. I mean, it’s fantastic.

Patrick Hunt: No, I really liked the spot, you know, it’s interesting. I come in here every year, and I go, okay, well, I can judge these by who I am as a person just watching a consumer or as an advertising professional, using air quotes for everybody out there. And, uh, like I read today, Adweek disagreed with Ad Age, and Ad Age and Adweek disagreed with USA Today, which is probably the fairest measure because that’s a pretty large panel. But everybody’s got an opinion. Smarht Pahk was number two in the USA Today Meter. And I had it pretty high. I thought it was pretty entertaining.

Adam Carter:
Pretty good. So that’s a Chiefs.

Patrick Hunt
:
I thought so.

Adam Carter:
By the way, Patrick Hunt, CEO of Hunt Adkins, talking the themes this year. We talked about this before we were going to have our conversation. Empowering women. Was that one of the themes?

Patrick Hunt: Yeah, I think it was a theme. I’m not sure there are any really strong hard themes this year. I think it’s been argued that empowering women was. But if you think about it, this audience is a lot broader; maybe then it was really early days of male viewership of football. So you have male and female, and you have a female range of products, so it’s pretty natural to focus on your target audience. So I think more is being made out of that then it really should be.

Adam Carter:
Okay. Other themes that we had last night.

Patrick Hunt:
Celebrities. Yeah, it’s lots and lots of celebrities. You know, the Walmart spots, celebrities meeting, movie cuts. Again, I think there’s a lot of laziness there. Although the next 100 spots for the NFL.

Adam Carter:
Very cool.

Patrick Hunt: You know, that one last year was really popular, and I thought it was a great transition to the next 100 years, and a really smart spot in the way they use it to introduce the ball into the game was really good.

Adam Carter: Yeah, that was a, we talked about that a little at the top of the show. The way they do that, they can blend a live event with them with a produced pre-produced, is so cool. The Alexa ad with all the celebrities and the different Alexas in the history, what did you rate that one?.

Patrick Hunt:
I thought it was very entertaining. I think you had a 49er if they had another touchdown. I think so. There’s a little political humor in there, but you know, a softer side of that, which is probably good. But I thought it was entertaining, well-produced, expensive, expensive. That was one of the most expensive spots probably.

Adam Carter: I bet. When it comes to this day and age, staying away from politics probably better than trying to weight into it, or what do you think?

Patrick Hunt:
Weighing in too deep. I mean, you know, there was the Nixon reference, which was frankly pretty appropriate from the time she said she wasn’t going to erase the tapes. So I’m not exactly sure which president that was. And then the fake news thing, I thought they just handled in a funny way, and then you can’t take it too seriously.

Adam Carter:
Great. Patrick, thanks so much for being in.

Patrick Hunt:
Always a pleasure.

Adam Carter:
We’ll have to start that Dead podcast very, very soon.

Patrick Hunt: It should start at midnight and go till 6 am, don’t you think?

Adam Carter:
Of course, we can get some sponsors for them. We’ve got a lot of texts coming in for more Dead talk. Thanks so much, Patrick Hunt, the CEO of Hunt Adkins here in town, recapping the Super Bowl.